‘I can’t even tell you how many we’ve seen’: Alberta storm chaser following tornadoes in Kansas

Several possible tornadoes were reported across parts of Kansas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Colorado on Tuesday and a team of Albertans were there to catch a glimpse of Mother Nature unleashing her full fury.

Cochrane-based storm chaser Braydon Morriseau said the storms he saw in Kansas Tuesday completely put him in awe. As a founding member of the Prairie Storm Chasers group, Morriseau has seen his share of tornadoes touchdown but said Tuesday was an extremely active and unique day.

WATCH: Tornadoes touch down in Kansas, more wild weather on the way

“We got a super cell where they were intersecting and it became a prolific tornado producer as it moved north,” Morriseau said as he described Tuesday’s chase. “It skirted the outskirts of Dodge City as a very large multi-vortex tornado.”

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    According to NBC News, the Dodge City tornado left two people critically injured and damaged an area landfill building.

    “I can’t even tell you how many we’ve seen … close to a dozen today,” Morriseau said in disbelief.

    “We did come up on one house that was skimmed by one of the tornadoes and checked on [the people there]. They were alright and then we continued and we came across a big propane tank in the middle of the road from like an oil rig site – and it was blowing propane out. It was pretty crazy.”

    But the rare sight of two tornadoes becoming one is what he says he will always remember. At around 6:30 p.m. local time, Morriseau reported seeing two separate twisters collide and become one.

    “It’s a very rare phenomena and that was probably my coolest moment, seeing the main tornado and then a little one – like a satellite tornado wrapping around it becoming one tornado.”

    Morriseau said they were careful to keep a safe distance and to list the time and exact location of each storm photo.

    “We’re trying to report and relay to the National Weather Service to give them some ground truth and let them know what’s going on visually.”

    Morriseau said he plans to stay in the region to guide severe weather tour groups for the next couple of weeks.

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